Study Finds Limited Sign of Soil Adaptation to Climate Warming
Soil warming experiment at Toolik Station Photo by Jim Tang(1)
This photo shows measurements of carbon flux from soil at Toolik Field Station in Arctic Alaska. Credit: Jianwu Tang

 

 WOODS HOLE, Mass. — While scientists and policy experts debate the impacts of global warming, the Earth’s soil is releasing roughly nine times more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than all human activities combined. This huge carbon flux from soil, which is due to the natural respiration of soil microbes and plant roots, begs one of the central questions in climate change science. As the global climate warms, will soil respiration rates increase, adding even more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere and accelerating climate change?

Previous experimental studies of this question have not produced a consensus, prompting Marine Biological Laboratory scientists Joanna Carey, Jianwu Tang and colleagues to synthesize the data from 27 studies across nine biomes, from the desert to the Arctic. Their analysis is published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This represents the world’s largest dataset to date of soil respiration response to experimental warming.

One prediction from the synthesis is that rising global temperatures result in regionally variable responses in soil respiration, with colder climates being considerably more responsive. “Consistently across all biomes, we found that soil respiration increased with soil temperature up to about 25° C (77° F),” says Carey, a postdoctoral scientist in the MBL Ecosystems Center. Above the 25° C threshold, respiration rates decreased with further increases in soil temperature.

“That means the Arctic latitudes, where soil temperatures rarely, if ever, reach 25° C , will continue to be most responsive to climate warming. Because there is so much carbon stored in frozen soils of the Arctic, this has really serious repercussions for future climate change,” Carey says.

Soil scientists are struggling to find evidences of soil acclimation to warming, as indicated by some individual field experiments, but the current study found limited evidence of it.

“The occurrence of acclimation would provide some relieve on the positive feedback between warming and CO2 release by respiration from soil” says Marc Estiarte, a member of the research teams at CREAF.

The information provided by the study will be critical to improve the soil-atmosphere interactions in the Earth-system models. The results of the study “will greatly improve our mechanistic understanding of how carbon dynamics change with climate warming”, in the words of Josep Peñuelas, a member of the research teams at CREAF

To understand how global carbon in soils will respond to climate change, the authors stress, more data are needed from under- and non-represented regions, especially the Arctic and the tropics.

 

Citation:

Carey, Joanna A. et al (2016) Temperature response of soil respiration largely unaltered with experimental warming. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1605365113

Josep Peñuelas receives Ramon Margalef’s Prize in Ecology 2016

Video of the award ceremony

Generalitat_08112016

Scientific forum on the occasion of the Ramon Margalef’s Prize

Video of the Forum

Premi Ramon Margalef 2016_def Forum científic_imatge
Scientific forum on the occasion of the Ramon Margalef’s Prize

On the occasion of the Ramón Margalef’s Prize to Josep Peñuelas, the Faculty of Biology and the University of Barcelona organise a scientific forum, next Monday, November 7 (at the Aula Magna in the Biology Faculty of the UB, at 10:00h).

Premi Ramon Margalef 2016_def

View the program here

Prof. Josep Peñuelas has received the Doctor Honoris causa degree by the Estonian University of Life Sciences

Professor Josep Peñuelas has been appointed by the Estonian University of Life Sciences as Doctor Honoris causa, in base to his outstanding merits. The ceremony was held the 23th September, at the Estonian University of Life Sciences.

The honorary doctorate recognized him as scientist in the field of global ecology who has contributed considerably to promoting international co-operation at Eesti Maaülikool.

Honorary doctorate is the highest recognition by the university rewarded for exceptional service to the University.

Pictures of the ceremony

http://www.emu.ee/ylikoolist/galerii/fotogalerii/akadeemiline-aktus-2016/#undefined

Video of the ceremony:

http://video.emu.ee/akadeemiline_aktus_2016.html

Tartu_2016_a Tartu_2016_b
Tartu_2016_e Tartu_2016_f
Tartu_2016_k Tartu_2016_g

 

Tartu_2016_c Tartu_2016_d
Tartu_2016_i Tartu_2016_l
Tartu_2016_n Tartu_2016_m
Tartu_2016_o Tartu_2016_p
Tartu_2016_q
IUFRO 2017 Congress – Biodiversity, Ecosystem Services and Biological Invasions

For the 125th anniversary congress of IUFRO (Freiburg, September 2017), Stephan Pietsch (IIASSA) has organised, together with Plinio Sist (IRAD) and Robert Nasi (CIFOR), as session entitled: “Progress in tropical forest management: Assuring sustainability, avoiding degradation and assisting restoration”.

Here we attach the full description of sessions under theme 4. The call will be opened until the end of november.

IUFRO 2017 – Session 4

Imbalance-P participates in the 53rd ATBC 2016 Meeting

Dr. Oriol Grau (CREAF) participated with a talk about his work on tropical forests in the 53rd meeting of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation (19-23 June 2016 – Montpellier, France).

The speach, entitled “Do soil characteristics determine forest structure and dynamics in poor Amazonian soils?” took place under the session “Management impacts on biodiversity and carbon/nutrient balances in the tropic” moderated by Prof. Stephan Pietch (IIASA).

Grau, O., Peñuelas, P., Ferry, B., Freycon, V., Lilian, B., Desprez, M., Baraloto, C., Chave, J., Descroix, L., Dourdain, A., Guitet, S., Janssens, I., Sardans, J., Herault, B. Do soil characteristics determine forest structure and dynamics in poor Amazonian soils? 53rd ATBC 2016, 19-23 June, Montellier, France.

 

Josep Peñuelas has been awarded Ramón Margalef’s Prize in Ecology 2016!

Ramon Margalef’s Prize in Ecology was created in 2004 by the Catalan Government to recognize people, all over the world, who have distinguished exceptionally in the field of ecological science. The award honors the memory of Professor Ramon Margalef (Barcelona, 1919-2004), who made a decisive contribution to establishing modern ecological science, to the point where he is regarded as one of the world’s leading figures in the field.

The Catalan television interviewed him yesterday. You can see the video here: Els Matins de TV3

Lore and Leandro in French Guiana – Blog

Lore and Leandro are two PhD students studying French Guiana’s forests for the Imbalance-P project. Want to know more about them, their research, and what is like living and doing science in French Guiana? Then, visit their blog here!

https://lllinfrenchguiana.wordpress.com/

Workshop – Nutrient limitation on land: how accurate are our global land models?

Philippe Ciais, Josep Peñuelas, Sara Vicca and Daniel Goll in collaboration with Chinese colleagues, organised a workshop entitled: Nutrient limitation on land: how accurate are our global land models?

The workshop was hosted by the Northwest Agricultural and Forestry University from the 15th to 17th June 2016 in the Yangling, Shaanxi, China.

You can access the program here.

Yangling together

Page 3 of 512345